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  • Events in the Neighborhood

    Ladera Golf Course Maintenance

    Our Superintendent James Lucero has informed us that maintenance will be top dressing the greens April 3rd, 4th, and 5th.

    Jr. Golf News & Notes from Ladera Golf Course

    Jr. Golf will be run by a Bulldog (Eric Alaniz) and a Tiger (David Lovato)!!! Bulldog and Tiger are putting together Albuquerque’s best Jr. Program. They are also forming The Ladera PGA Jr. League. Ladera will be the place to be for the finest JR Golf instruction, introduction, and all out fun!!!

    67th Annual Brother Mathias Corned Beef and Cabbage

    Saturday March 17, 2018 4pm to 8pm at St Pius High School, 5301 St Joseph’s Drive NW.

    Tickets: $15.00 Adults, $5.00 Children 12 and Under. Proceeds support the Good Shepard Center, providing shelter to the homeless since 1951.

    Tickets may be purchased online at:  https://www.goodshepherdcenternm.org/

    Bernalillo County Accepting Applications for Youth Sports Leagues at Reduced Fees

    The County is now accepting applications for youth sports leagues, offering reduced prices to all kids in the City and County. The fee for registration is based on family income. The county will also offer reduced fees for after school programs and summer camps. Applications can be picked up at the County Sports Office, 111 Union Square SE, Ste. 200., or online at: www.bernco.gov

    Library Branches Offer Storytime for Babies, Toddlers and Pre-Schoolers

    Many of our city libraries offer terrific resources for parents, and the Storytime events are among the favorites. The weekly Storytime dates and times vary, but you can find one each week at nearly every branch. To learn more about Storytime for your little one, visit: www.abqlibrary.org

    Get Involved With Your City Government

    Ever wanted to learn more about how city government works or how policy is created? Interested in finding out how different departments operate? Now is the time to get involved! You can join a Policy Team, serve on one of 60+ committees and boards, volunteer, or even apply to work with the City of Albuquerque. Visit:https://www.cabq.gov/mayor/citizen-engagement and learn how you can make a difference!

    ART Lanes for Buses Only – Please Drive with Caution

    The Albuquerque Rapid Transit (ART) has started limited service on Central Avenue, and drivers are reminded that the ART bus-only lanes are for buses and emergency vehicles only, not for regular car traffic. Drivers caught in the ART bus-only lanes will be ticketed by Albuquerque Police Department. For more information on the ART bus lanes, or general information, call the ART hotline at (505) 398-4ART, or visit:www.brtabq.com

    Northwest Area Command Community Policing Council meetings:

    Held the third Tuesday of every month at 6:00 PM. The meeting is at the Northwest Area Command Substation located at 10401 Cibola Loop, NW 87114 across from Cibola High School.

  • Bernalillo County Happenings

    WATER CONSERVATION PROGRAM

    Bernalillo County’s Water Conservation Program promotes the efficient and responsible use of the County’s water resources.

    We do this through:

    1. Water conservation education and outreach
    2. High-Efficiency Toilet Retrofit and Rain Barrel incentive programs
    3. Prohibiting water waste and requiring water conservation for new development, remodels, and additions through our Water Conservation Ordinance and supporting Water Conservation Development Standards and Guidelines
    4. Leading by example by conserving water at County facilities.

    Water Conservation Tips 

    Visit https://www.bernco.gov/water for great tips on water conservation and information on the 40-Gallon challenge!

    February Open Space Events:

    Backyard Farming Series:
    Landscape for Life Spring Series
    Sustainability in Home Garden & Role of Soil in a Sustainable Garden
    Gutierrez-Hubbell House, 6029 Isleta Blvd. SW
    Saturday, Feb. 24, 9 a.m. – noon
    This nationally recognized program covers the basics needed to plan and design your home garden landscape focusing on sustainability, permaculture, and wise use of our limited natural resources. Each of the five total workshops builds on information shared from previous classes and offers tools to assess your home landscape. Participants who attend all five sessions will receive a certificate and have a chance to win a free rain barrel and other giveaways.
    Following each workshop in this series is an extended mentor-led hands-on project for interested participants who want practical experiences and do not mind getting their hands dirty.
    History and Culture of New Mexico Series:
    Foods We’ve Come To Love: The Mestizaje of NM Cuisine
    Gutierrez-Hubbell House, 6029 Isleta Blvd. SW
    Sunday, Feb. 25, 1-2:30 p.m.
    Presenter: Cherie Montoya
    New Mexican cuisine is a wonderful cultural fusion of Native American and European influences. This presentation will explore the origins, practices, heritages, traditions and ingredients that, combined with local terrain and climate, results in the distinctive dishes we’ve come to love.
    Second Annual High Tea on the Bosque
    Bachechi Open Space, 9521 Rio Grande Blvd. NW
    Sunday, Feb. 25, 4-6 p.m.
    Presented by Burque Noir
    In honor of Black History Month, celebrate the cultural diversity and heroes of New Mexico with an afternoon of live performances, visual art and hands-on art activities for the entire family. Burque Noir produces brilliant multi-media experiences of arts and entertainment as delivered by a vast array of Black artist and performers. This event will feature singer-songwriter Tawanda Suessbrich-Joaquim from Las Cruses as well as recitalist and vocal coach Leon Eldridge from Albuquerque. Queneesha Myers with Cakes and Sweets Boutique will be providing scrumptious treats to go with the tea.
    No need to register, just come to Bachechi for this spectacular event.

     

  • 311 is Here for You

    If you are having any non-emergency issues (weeds, trash, zoning, lost animals, etc.) don't forget you can make a report through 3-1-1 or online at: https://www.cabq.gov/311/abq311/
    You can also download their app!

  • Safety

    Hi neighbors,

    Here is a video from the Department of Homeland Security about Active Shooters.  It covers the basics and is seven minutes in length:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pY-CSX4NPtg

  • Check out the latest Neighborhood Newsletters

    From the City, the County and APD - just go to our "Neighborhood News" page!
  • Archives

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10 Important Crime Safety Tips for Home Owners & Renters

Hello Neighbors!  These safety tips, which came from the Office of BernCo Neighborhood Coordination, are spot on and we thought worth sharing.  Have a happy and safe summer!!!

Essential Crime Prevention Tips Every Homeowner Should Know:

Courtesy of: http://criminaljusticephd.org/crime-prevention-tips-for-homeowners

Smart homeowners plan for the worst–natural disasters, rusty pipes, burglaries, and the like. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the rate of household burglary decreased by more than half from 1994 to 2011, from a peak of 63.4 victimizations to 27.6 victimizations per 1,000 households. But the median financial loss during completed burglaries went up, from $389 in 1994 to $600 in 2011 (numbers adjusted for inflation). No matter where you live, you can protect yourself more effectively by planning ahead–and it doesn’t have to involve putting steel bars over your windows, adopting a dog, or investing in an expensive security system (though those may help too). The National Neighborhood Watch Association suggests that homeowners looking to burglar-proof their homes should take a three-fold approach: deter, detect, and delay. Here are 10 essential crime prevention tips to help your home a less desirable target for burglary:

Tip #1: Case the joint.

Walk around your home with the eyes of a burglar. Look for weaknesses–sliding doors that could be jimmied off the track, glass that could be broken to gain entry, window unit air conditioners that could be easily removed, and so forth. A committed burglar can usually find a way into a house, but you can make it more difficult for them, and this starts with knowing your property and potential entry points for a break-in. Take a walk around the outside as well and note what pricey items are in view, tempting would-be burglars.

Tip #2: Lock the door.

It may seem obvious, but the BLS reports that more than 40 percent of burglaries don’t include forced entry–meaning people are leaving doors and windows unlocked. Install deadbolts on all doors; double cylinders are best, since they require a key on both sides of the door, and it prevents burglars from breaking a pane of glass, reaching around, and unlocking the door. (Check your area’s fire code first; some places don’t allow double cylinder locks because they can trap inhabitants inside in the event of a fire.) And remember to lock the door leading from the garage to the house, even if the garage door is down. (It’s easy to manipulate.)

Tip #3: Don’t hide a key.

One day, you forget your keys, and you decide it’s a good idea to hide one under the doormat or one of those fake rocks. That’s a terrible idea. Get rid of that idea right now, and pretend you never even considered it. Give a spare key to a neighbor instead. If your closest neighbor lives 10 miles away, and you absolutely must leave a spare key outside, put it in a combination lockbox.

Tip #4: Don’t label your keys or mailbox.

If you lose your key and it has your address written on it, well–you do the math. It’s pretty easy to become a target. Also, don’t write your last name on your mailbox. It’s easy to look you up, find your phone numbers, maybe even your workplace, and begin to track your movements in preparation to enter the home when you’re not around.

Tip #5: Secure windows and sliding doors.

Many sliding doors can be popped off the frame, even when locked. Prevent this by placing a strong steel bar or two-by-four in the back groove, which prevents the door from sliding along the groove and opening. You can do the same with windows: Install a nail in the frame to prevent the window from opening more than a few inches.

Tip #6: Be modest.

Prevent your home from being a target by tucking away expensive items. Keep both the car and the bike in the garage. After purchasing a new piece of expensive electronic equipment, dispose of the box directly instead of leaving it next to your trash can–which lets would-be burglars know you have something shiny and new that could bring in great cash on the black market. While you’re at it, consider keeping expensive jewelry and your mattress full of cash somewhere safer, like a safe deposit box.

Tip #7: Create the illusion you’re always home.

The majority of burglaries take place when people aren’t home, particularly during the day, while the victims are at work. Deter burglars by creating the impression that you’re always home: Leave on lights, the radio, or the television. And if you’re going on vacation for awhile, don’t advertise your absence. Arrange for someone to pick up the mail, newspapers, mow the lawn, shovel the snow, and set out trash cans regularly.

Tip #8: Secure the area surrounding your house.

Secure the yard: Trim bushes and trees to discourage burglars from using them as hiding places. Avoid planting low shrubs in front of windows; you may even consider planting thorny shrubs for an added deterrent. And be sure to add lighting outside your home.

Tip #9: Get to know the neighbors.

Tight-knit communities suffer fewer burglaries because people look out for each other and strangers stick out. If your neighborhood doesn’t already have a Neighborhood Watch Program, consider starting one. Studies have found they reduce crime and violence in a given neighborhood.

Tip #10: Install an alarm system–or at least a sign.

Alarm systems are available at a number of price points, but an effective one should include sensors at entry points, motion detectors inside the house, and a loud outdoor alarm that alerts the entire neighborhood when someone has forced entry. If you don’t want to go all-out, fake out would-be burglars by sticking a home security system sign in your yard. The threat of an alarm may be enough to keep them from trying.

 

 

 

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