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  • Around the Neighborhood

     

    KRQE State,county ordered closures issued because of Coronavirus – New Mexico

    https://www.krqe.com/health/coronavirus-new-mexico/canceled-events-because-of-coronavirus-new-mexico-list/

     

    KOB NEW MEXICO CLOSINGS & DELAYS

    https://www.kob.com/closings/

     

    The 2020 Census is happening now. You can respond online, by phone, or by mail.

    https://2020census.gov/en.html

     

    Support Local Businesses During COVID-19 Public Health Emergency
    Many small local restaurants and businesses have been severely and negatively impacted by the COVID-19 (coronavirus) public health emergency, and residents can help by supporting them as much as possible during this time. There are many small ways we can help.

    • Buy a gift certificate to use later from a local bookstore.
    • Order takeout or delivery from a local restaurant and tip your delivery person extra well.
    • Check with local restaurants to see if they are selling food stock,and consider purchasing groceries from them.

     

    When this public health crisis is over, support local businesses as much as possible in the coming months. They will need the help.

    To see a listing of all local restaurants, including phone numbers and online menus, that are open and ready to take your to-go or delivery order, visit: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-ZOcp7eTyc9ztxJkf3IhgONb0J_ta5KtiVdZ3OGpevI/edit?fbclid=IwAR0KDDT7o6nifbzkCmOGl8AjVqsxgZTUXmTPAeODaveu3G2Num5yDOewrpU#gid=0

     

    “How Can I Help?” Ways You Can Assist During COVID-19 Public Health Emergency
    The City has received numerous offers of help from residents, and is coordinating volunteer opportunities online. Many Albuquerque residents have asked how to help in addressing the concerns and needs of our community and the City has provided an online listing of these opportunities at: https://cabq.galaxydigital.com

     

    Utilize Free Online Services Through the Public Library!
    With the majority of residents social distancing, self-quarantining, working from home or staying home with kids due to the coronavirus outbreak, having access to online services and projects is essential now. Did you know that you can check out online books, listen to free music, and access a huge variety of virtual services, classes and projects, all by visiting www.abqlibrary.org and using your library card! Don’t have a library card? You can apply for a temporary card by by contacting the Library’s Customer Service number at (505) 768-5170.

     

    From APD Northwest Area Commander Cecily Barker

    As our community is practicing social distancing, I wanted to reach out and provide some information:

    • The department is practicing social distancing and has several measures and contingency plans in place in response to the COVID19 virus.
    • While some non-essential employees are working from home, the Northwest Substation remains open.
    • The Northwest Substation is serving as one of the locations accepting donations for seniors.
    • When practical, officers are taking reports over the phone.
    • When not on a call for service, officers have been directed to continually patrol the parking lots of stores within the Area Command.
    • The Northwest Area Command is working with the Parks and Recreation department to provide extra patrol and safety measures at parks through the end of June.
    • I encourage you to continue to report any suspicious activity. Call 911 for an emergency and 242-COPS for non-emergency.
    • All community events and neighborhood association meetings have been cancelled per Mayor Keller’s initiative concerning the COVID19 virus.
    • Officers are still expected to communicate with their Block Captains. Unless mitigating circumstances exist, we have recommended that the communication occur via                  telephone or email.
    • If you have any questions or concerns, please reach out to us.

     

    Cecily Barker                      cabrker@cabq.gov

    Pete Gelabert                    pgelabert@cabq.gov

    Lt. Ana Nunez                    anunez@cabq.gov

    Lt. Michael Brodbeck         mbrodbeck@cabq.gov

    Lt. Jose Sanchez                josesanchez@cabq.gov

     

    Federal and State Tax Deadlines Postponed Until July 15

    The Federal Treasury has postponed federal tax filing – Tax Day – until Wednesday, July 15, and the New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department has followed suit for state filing. This applies to personal, business, corporate, and withholding taxes. To learn more, visit: https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/tax-day-now-july-15-treasury-irs-extend-filing-deadline-and-federal-tax-payments-regardless-of-amount-owed

     

    Northwest Area Command Community Policing Council Meetings:

    Held the third Tuesday of every month at 6:00 PM. The meeting is at the Northwest Area Command Substation located at 10401 Cibola Loop, NW 87114 across from Cibola High School.

     

  • Outreach and Assistance Events

    Assessor’s Office Annual Veteran Outreach

    Bernalillo County – Tanya R. Giddings and the New Mexico Department of Veteran Services (NMDVS) continue to hold monthly outreaches for New Mexico’s veterans to receive their tax-exemption certificates, which can be applied toward a qualifying veteran’s property, for tax-saving purposes.  The last outreach will be held on April 23, to ensure property owners can apply for their veteran property tax exemptions with the county Assessor’s Office, no later than 30 days after the mailing of the notice of value statements.

     

    There are two veteran property tax exemptions available. Any veteran who served a minimum of 90 consecutive active duty days (other than training), and who was honorably discharged, and is a legal resident of New Mexico, can qualify for a $4,000 reduction in the taxable value of their real property for taxation purposes. This benefit is also available to unremarried surviving spouses of veterans.  There is also a 100% disabled veteran property tax exemption available to any veteran who has been determined to have a 100% total and permanent service-connected disability by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and who is a legal resident of New Mexico. This exemption grants a 100% property tax waiver on the veteran’s primary residence, and the veteran will need to present his or her award letter from the Veterans Administration to be eligible for the 100% benefit. The veteran outreach events will be held at the Assessor’s Office (501 Tijeras Ave. NW Albuquerque, NM 87102) from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. on March 19, April 16 and April 23, 2020.  Please visit the Assessor’s website for additional information.

    Applications are available at Bernalillo County Assessor website (https://www.bernco.gov/assessor/excemptions-applications-other.aspx) or visit the NMDVS website, (http://www.nmdvs.org/ )

    Income Tax Assistance

    Make your appointment for assistance with taxes.  Los Volcanes Senior Center, 6500 Los Volcanes NW, 836-8745.  Friday February 7 – April 10, 2020 APPOINTMENTS ONLY

     

  • What’s Going on in Albuquerque

    APD RESPONSE TIMES NOW 93% LONGER (As published in the February 25th edition of the Albuquerque Journal)

    An analysis shows that Albuquerque police are taking 93% longer to respond to 911 calls compared with nine years ago.  KOAT-TV reports an examination of the Albuquerque Police Department’s response times shows officers now take an average of 48 minutes to arrive to a scene.   That’s a 23-minute jump from 2011.  Albuquerque Emergency Communications Center manager Erika Wilson says police are doing the best they can with the resources available.

     

    FBI Accepting Applications for Teen Academy
    High school juniors and seniors can spend a week with the agency in Albuquerque which will feature presentations from FBI Special Agents on a variety of areas like cybersecurity,
    evidence handling, and terrorism. Students who are accepted into the program are expected to attend all of the program’s activities which run from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. every day.
    Students will also get the opportunity to participate in the FBI Special Agent Physical Fitness Test. The academy will be held from June 8 to June 12.  The deadline to apply is April 15.
    Applications can be requested by writing to aq.outreach@fbi.gov or calling (505) 889-1330.  For more information go to:

    https://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field-offices/albuquerque/news/press-releases/fbi-media-alert-albuquerque-fbi-division-accepting-applications-for-summer-teen-academy

     

    Albuquerque Oddities & Curiosities Expo

    Saturday, March 7th, 11:00am – 6:00pm

    TIME: VIP Entry: 10AM // General Admission Entry: 11AM – 6PM, LOCATION: Expo NM – Lujan Building

    ENTRY COST: VIP $20 // GA $10 // Kids 12 & Under Free

    The Oddities & Curiosities Expo showcases hand selected vendors, dealers, artists and small businesses from all over the country with all things weird. You’ll find items such as taxidermy, preserved specimens, original artwork, horror/halloween inspired pieces, antiques, handcrafted oddities, quack medical devices, clothing, jewelry, skulls/bones, funeral collectibles & much more. We truly have something weird for everyone. All items you see at our shows are legal to own and sustainably sourced.  The O&C Expo provides a safe place for anyone to come and discover new artists, meet new friends and be surrounded by an amazing community of like-minded people.

     

     

    Senior Centers Offer Many Community Resources and Classes!    

    The City has eight Senior Centers citywide, all of which offer a wide variety of fun and innovative resources, exercise classes, arts and crafts, and best of all, meals! Breakfast and lunch are provided for free to senior citizens 60 and older, with a small donation requested if possible, but no one is turned away. Classes such as pickleball, writing, retablo wood carving, computer skills, languages and so many more, are all on offer to our seniors in the community. To see a full list of

    all services offered by our senior centers, including Meal Sites, visit: www.cabq.gov/seniors/documents/dsa_activitiescat_2020_webfinal.pdf

     

    AARP Smart Driver 

    This one day, four-hour class provide techniques for coping with changes in vision, hearing, and reaction time, along with a “rules of the road” review.  No tests are involved.  $15 for AARP members $20 for non-members.  Make check payable to AARP and bring it to the class.  Los Volcanes Senor Center (6500 Los Volcanes NW).  1st Monday of each month, 9:00am-1:15pm.  Call 767-5999  to reserve you seat

     

    Plastic Bag REMINDER! 

    Single-Use Plastic Bags Will No Longer Be Offered in Stores and Businesses Starting January 1, 2020.

    Starting Wednesday, January 1, 2020, local stores and businesses will no longer carry plastic bags for shoppers. The City Council passed the Clean and Green Retail Ordinance last April, prohibiting businesses from providing single-use plastic bags to customers. To learn more about Clean and Green visit:

    http://www.cabq.gov/solidwaste/clean-and-green-retail-ordinance

     

    NM Gas Company Offers Free Online Savings Tool

    Interested in learning how you might conserve natural resources within your home during winter months? The New Mexico Gas Company now has a free analysis tool available to help you. Visit: https://nmgc.energysavvy.com/residential/start/   and start saving today!

     

    Freedom to Ride Program Expands Transit Options for Military Veterans
    The New Mexico Rail Runner has expanded its Freedom to Ride Program, and now, all active duty military, veterans and anyone with a federally-issued veteran or military photo ID can ride the Rail Runner for free! To learn more, visit: www.riometro.org

     

    LearningExpress Library Offers Numerous Online Study and and Homework Resources
    LearningExpress Library is a great online resource that offers online tutoring, homework assistance in English and Spanish, test preparation, and career preparation for students of all ages!  Best of all, it’s free, all you need is a library card.
    Visit:www.learningexpresshub.com/productengine/LELIndex.html#/learningexpresslibrary/libraryhome?AuthToken=91614C7C-629D-4D6C-A8A2-8709C84561E0 to learn more!

     

    Free general admission to Albuquerque Museum 

    On the following dates :

    Enjoy a pleasant stroll in our sculpture garden with a friendly docent who will sharing stories  on the artists and their works. No reservations necessary.  General admission is free for the following times also:
    9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the first Wednesday of every month
    5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of every month
    9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Sunday

  • Landscaping Tips

    Find out about the Water Authority’s Spring Watering Recommendations here

     

    The Water Authority has scoured the internet, met with local experts, and pulled together a great educational resource list for you. When you’re ready to dig into all there is to know about landscaping in New Mexico, these resources are ready for you.

    Plants:

    Native Plant Society of New Mexico

    New Mexico Rare Plants
    NM Plant Database
    Tree New Mexico
    NMSU Extension Service

    NM State Forestry Division: Urban and Community Forestry

    NM State Forestry Division: Re-Leaf Program

    NM Department of Agriculture: Pesticide Compliance Division

    Water efficiency/conservation/irrigation/:

    Office of the State Engineer
    NM Climate Center

    The Enchanted Xeriscape

    Xeriscape 101

    Lean & Green

    Irrigation Basics

    A Waterwise Guide to Trees

    A Waterwise Guide to Rainwater Harvesting

    A Waterwise Guide to Rainwater Harvesting (Spanish version)

    The Complete How To Guide to Xeriscape

    Xeriscaping: The Complete How To Guide, 2011 Regional Edition

    Rainwater Harvesting, Supply from the Sky

    Low Volume Irrigation Design and Installation Guide

    Using Gray Water in New Mexico’s Residential Landscapes

    New Mexico Gray Water Guide

    Roof-reliant Landscaping

    Irrigation Video Series from OSE

    Education/Classes/Events:

    The Master Gardener Hotline: (505) 292-7144 March-October, 9:30-2:30 Monday – Friday
    New Mexico Garden Clubs resource page
    Albuquerque Seed Library
    Desert Oasis Teaching Garden
    Bernalillo County Master Composters
    Xeriscape Council of New Mexico
    Think Trees New Mexico
    Desert Blooms Blog

    NMSU Cooperative Extension Service

    Books:

    Agaves, Yuccas and Related Plants. Mary Irish, Portland Oregon: Timber Press, 2000.

    A Field Guide to the Plants and Animals of the Middle Rio Grande Bosque. Jean-Luc Cartron, David Lightfoot, Jane Mygatt, Sandra Brantley and Timothy Lowrey, Albuquerque, New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 2008.

    Landscaping with Native Plants of the Southwest. George Oxford Miller, Minneapolis, MN: Voyageur Press, 2007

    Native Plants for High-Elevation Western Gardens. Janice Busco and Nancy R. Morin, Golden, Colorado: Fulcrum Publishing, 2003.

    Natural by Design. Judith Phillips, Santa Fe, NM: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1995.

    New Mexico Gardener’s Guide, Revised Edition. Judith Phillips, Brentwood, TN: Cool Springs Press, 2005.

    New Mexico Plants Made Easy, Jill Brown, Albuquerque, NM, 2015.

    Plants for Natural Gardens. Judith Phillips, Santa Fe, NM: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1995.

    Penstemons. Robert Nold, Portland, Oregon: Timber Press, 1999.

    Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 and 2. Brad Lancaster, Tucson, Arizona: Rainsource Press, 2006 and 2008.

    Southwestern Landscaping with Native Plants, Revised Edition. Judith Phillips, Santa Fe, NM: Museum of New Mexico Press (First edition 1987, 2002).

    Water-Wise Plants for the Southwest. Nan Sterman, Mary Irish, Judith Phillips, and Joe Lamp’l, Brentwood, TN: Cool Springs Press, 2010.

    Weeds of the West. Western Society of Weed Science and Cooperative Extension Service, Jackson, Wyoming: University of Wyoming, 1991.

    These resources are available at 505outside.com/resources

    Author: Jill Brown, ASLA Landscape Architect and owner of My Landscape Coach in Albuquerque, NM.

  • Bernalillo County Happenings

    An Updated Message from the Bernalillo County Housing Authority

    An Updated Message from the Bernalillo County Housing Authority: The spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) is a critical nationwide concern and the top priority of the Bernalillo County Housing Authority, to ensure that our staff, residents, program participants, landlords and partners are protected when working with us. We ask that you not visit our office or residential properties. Instead, please call us at (505) 314-0200 or fax us at (505) 462-9737. We are here to answer questions and concerns you may have. The Bernalillo County Housing office will be closed for moving from March 23 to March 30, 2020. When it re-opens, Bernalillo County Housing will not host any in-person meetings, briefings or client meetings at our office. Instead, work will be conducted via email, phone, fax and virtually. We ask that you use electronic methods instead of coming into the office. This is for everyone’s safety. Thank you for your continued cooperation and support.

     

    March Bernalillo County Sheriff’s Office Newsletter now available.  Check out the crime reduction safety tips and other great information.

     

    Seminar for Women Seeking a Career In Law Enforcement 

    Upcoming Seminar from the Bernalillo County Sheriff’s Office.  Thursday, April 30th at the BCSO Regional Training Academy, 415 Tijeras NW (4th floor).  Meet female deputies of BCSO, hear about their careers, lean about our culture as a agency & opportunities to make a difference in our community.  for a Seminar for Women seeking a career in law enforcement. Call 804-0000 today to reserve your seat, or for more information

     

    BernCo News Release: Assessor Partners with NM Dept. of Veteran Services for Veteran’s Outreach   

    Office of the Assessor for Bernalillo County Hosts Third Annual Veteran Outreach Partnership with New Mexico Department of Veteran Services.  Bernalillo County.  The veteran outreach kicks off in December, and will be on the third Thursday of every month until April 2020, with an additional date in April added, to ensure property owners applying for the veteran property tax exemptions meet the deadline, which is 30 days after the mailing of the notice of value statements.   This year, because of the continuing partnership, qualifying veterans will be able to obtain, at the veteran outreach, their tax exemption certificates on-site from the NMDVS and then be able to apply for their veteran property tax exemption with the Bernalillo County Assessor’s Office.

     

  • 311 is Here for You

    311 Customer Service Survey Invites Public Feedback

    Have you taken the 311 Customer Service Survey yet? This online survey offers you the chance to give feedback and share ideas for making the City’s 311 service more open, accessible and accountable to the community it serves. To take the survey, visit:https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/S8TKMZV

    311 Citizen Contact Center

    Information about the 311 Citizen Contact Center.

    The 311 Citizen Contact Center is a centralized call center for the City of Albuquerque. The 311 service is a single telephone number for all non-emergency City of Albuquerque inquiries and services.

    We answer questions and respond to requests for service.

    Hours

    Monday through Saturday – 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    Sunday – 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Animal welfare calls and fixed bus times)

    How Can We Help?

    There are several ways the City of Albuquerque and 311 can answer questions or requests for service.

    Click here for website

     

    The new City website link to report abandoned vehicles.

        Report Abandoned Vehicles at: https://www.cabq.gov/report-abandoned-vehicles/report-abandoned-vehicles

     

  • Safety

    Sign Up for APD’s Security Camera Analytical Network! Does your home or business have a security camera? Register it with the Albuquerque Police Department (APD) Security Camera Analytical Network (SCAN) network at: www.cabq.gov/scan. Connecting your street-facing security camera to the SCAN network can help counter crime in your area and helps APD with visual surveillance and information in the event a crime was captured on camera.

     

     

  • Check out the latest Neighborhood Newsletters

    From the City, the County and APD - just go to our "Neighborhood News" page!
  • Archives

Ways You Can Help Seniors In Our Community

See the list of items and places to drop off here:

Senior Affairs is collecting food and other necessities for distribution to seniors in
need such as shelf-stable food, toilet paper and personal hygiene items.
Items can be dropped of police substations in Albuquerque or at the Department of
Senior Affairs offices. A list of locations, addresses, phone numbers and items can be
found at cabq.gov/seniors.

Seniors are one of the populations most impacted by the outbreak of the novel
coronavirus (COVID-19) in New Mexico. Many are choosing to avoid stores
or other public locations to limit their exposure and many simply struggle to
afford necessary items. That’s why we are encouraging you to help seniors in
our community by donating needed items, money or your own time. Below are
some ways you can support the Department of Senior Affairs:
Donations of Items:
Senior Affairs is collecting food and other necessities for distribution to seniors
in need such as shelf-stable food, toilet paper and personal hygiene items.
Individuals and organizations that wish to support these efforts can drop off
items at police substations in Albuquerque or at the Department of Senior
Affairs offices. A list of locations, addresses, phone numbers and items can be
found at cabq.gov/seniors.
Encouragement:
Notes of encouragement to seniors are always welcome and can be included at
these distribution points or emailed to jenifergonzales@cabq.gov. Senior
Affairs Home-Delivered Meal program drivers will distribute these notes
to seniors when they receive their meal and they will be available at meal
locations, in addition to on our Facebook and Instagram pages: @cabqseniors.
Donations of Time or Money:
Organizations in the community that support seniors are also looking for
monetary donations and volunteers at this time. For example, Meals on Wheels
is looking for volunteer drivers who are under the age of 50 to help meet their
increase in demand. The Meals on Wheels service is a home delivered meal
program, similar to the Department of Senior Affairs Home-Delivered Meal
program.
For a list of partner organizations, visit cabq.gov/seniors.

311 Community Contact Center Committed to Improved Caller Experience, Better Results

Thank you to our friends at Ladera Heights Neighborhood Association for sharing the following information.  We hope you find it helpful and informative.

cid:image001.jpg@01D556AA.451D6100

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jessie Damazyn | 505-259-0650

2/10/2020

311 Community Contact Center Committed to Improved Caller Experience, Better Results

Leaders outline challenges, progress at community information hub

 

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M — In front of a backdrop of 311 specialists taking calls from the public, City of Albuquerque leaders outlined steps they’ve taken to improve the service and additional targets for improvement in 2020.

 “311 is a problem-solving center: we answer questions for the public and use information the public gives us to get out there and fix issues,” said Mayor Tim Keller. “But it’s also had its challenges, some of which we have solved, and others we are working to solve to improve service for our residents.”

 “At its best, 311 makes government accessible and easy to navigate, improving quality of life for residents,” said Carrie Prothero, 311 Contact Center Division Manager. “When residents contact us, they don’t have to navigate the complicated system of who at the City does what and where. With one call they have the correct information or we’ve sent their request where it needs to go.”

 311 takes nearly 900,000 requests for service or questions per year through the call center, on mobile platforms like the OneABQ app, or online at www.cabq.gov/abq311. In 2018, the City added the convenience of using Amazon Alexa to contact 311. Representatives also attend dozens of events per year to interact in person.

In January of 2020, the most common calls were for bus information (17, 731), missed trash pickup or other solid waste (12,218), animal welfare (6,402), municipal development or street repair (2,363), and planning or code violations (1,515).

 311 sends service requests to departments by sending a case ticket. The department then fixes the problem and closes the ticket. Based on a high number of unresolved tickets when he took office, Mayor Tim Keller instituted a monthly reporting process of unresolved reports.

 The Mayor’s office prioritized getting departments to take action on unresolved issues or, in some cases, simply come into alignment by reporting completed work back to 311. In two years, unresolved tickets across the City have dropped by almost 90%. Those numbers are led by a 99% drop in Animal Welfare, part of a major turnaround in that department, a 93% drop in transit, and an 85% drop in Solid Waste.

 311 also closely tracks how long it takes to answer calls and the quality of calls, factors driven largely by staffing levels. This year the center has met its staffing goals for the first time since tracking began at the start of the Keller administration. 90% of calls are now answered within 30 seconds, and each agent has the capacity to focus fully on the quality of each call. Additionally, 311 has five Spanish speakers to eliminate language barriers to service.

 The City has examined the possibility of keeping the call center open around the clock. Staffing the center 24 hours a day, seven days a week would add about a half million dollars to the 311 budget. In the meantime, the One Albuquerque app makes it possible to get information and report issues 24 hours a day.

 “While we are excited about the progress we’ve been able to make in the last two years, we have also identified longer-term issues that we will continue to tackle, and that’s our focus moving forward,” said Brian Osterloh, whose Department of Technology and Innovation oversees the 311 systems.

Call Response Times

The 311 contact center is now fully staffed and on track to meet this service level for the 4th month in a row, something that has not been accomplished since 2015. Over the last few years, the City has added at least 10 new staff members to 311. The City decreased the time to hire at 311 from about 180 days to about 85 days, effectively giving 311 three additional full-time employees without adding budget.

 

Closing Out 311 Call

Handoffs to Third Parties. Callers to 311 are persistently frustrated when they find the City does not control the issue they are reporting. In the past, callers were referred to the outside agency that could help and the call was closed. While that may be appropriate in some cases, the public should be able to rely on the City to track some issues, like broken streetlights.

PNM owns streetlights in the oldest parts of town. With the conversion of City-owned lights to LED, a third-party provider named Citelum handles repairs. In the past, broken streetlight callers were told to call one of two secondary service providers. Now, 311 simplifies the process for residents by identifying right away whether it is a City or a PNM-owned light. They then send a ticket to the Department of Municipal Development (DMD) to take over the process of working with the responsible party. 

For City-owned lights, DMD routes the issue to Citelum and closes the ticket. Citelum then reports back monthly to DMD. We are developing a system wherein Citelum will report back immediately each time they fix a light.  For PNM-owned lights, DMD sends PNM a notice and then closes the ticket. There is no current system in place for PNM to report back to the City when a light is fixed, but the City is working on an MOU that would require lights reported to PNM be repaired within 72 hours.

Handoffs to Other Internal Systems. Over time the City implemented various systems across departments to manage work orders. There is a program called Chameleon for Animal Welfare, Posse for Planning, and Yardi for Parks and Recreation.

311 was closing tickets when the issue was referred to any one of these other systems. That led to an issue with calls showing as closed in the 311 system before the problem was actually fixed. To fix this, 311 worked with individual departments to connect, and sometimes create, interfaces between each of these other systems and our 311 system.

Just 10 days ago, the City integrated the Posse system used by the Planning Department, and now, requests that go to Planning stay open in both systems until it has been resolved. Once the ticket has been resolved at Planning, it is closed in both the Posse and 311 systems. 

Using Data to Drive Change

While the City’s goal is to respond to every resident’s issue as quickly as possible, each request that comes in is balanced against all the other ways City resources are being used. Using 311 data, decision-makers are identifying problems when they are on the rise and using that data to change how resources are used. When resources are limited, call center specialists can be clear about what residents can expect when they report an issue.

Missed Trash Pickups. Missed trash pickups are a frequent driver of 311 calls. Over 2,100 of the roughly 12,000 calls for Solid Waste were for missed trash pickups.  Based on data from 311, Solid Waste hired an extra staffer dedicated to managing missed trash pickups. In addition, 311 changed the script for missed trash pick-up calls, which ensures callers have an accurate expectation for when their missed trash pickup will be collected.

Homeless Camp Triage. Formerly, reports related to homelessness were universally routed to 242-COPS. Working closely with departments, 311 found it was more efficient to triage these calls based on location. Now, encampments on City property are routed to Family and Community Services’ (FCS) Outreach Coordinator. Debris under highways were once routed to the New Mexico Department of Transportation, but are now referred to Solid Waste.

This change made it clear the City needed more resources for encampment clean up. The Family & Community Services Department hired a full-time outreach manager for homeless encampments, which also helped ensure that people who are camping illegally are connected to services and shelter.

Cracked Streets. The City also receives dozens of calls per day about cracked streets, but does not have crew capacity to respond to each call in the moment. Instead, departments take a data-driven approach. When the crack is not in need of an immediate fix, DMD uses 311 data to help set priorities for its annual streets maintenance plan.

The City also changed the 311 script so the caller knows if their call is being addressed through the annual planning process.

Sharps. In analyzing unclosed tickets, the new administration found that multiple departments were specifically responsible for picking up sharps. By making Parks and Recreation the lead agency for sharps, the administration increased efficiency and accountability in an important public safety area.

Sharps calls also took a lot of time to respond to, because if they were reported in a location like a park, it would take a worker quite a bit of time to find and remove it. Now reports of sharps can be made through the One ABQ app, where you may also submit a photo of the location. That helps the City respond to those calls more quickly.

Abandoned Vehicles

Duplicate and ghost tickets, which refer to multiple calls on one issue, or calls on an issue that is resolved by the time a department goes out to check on it, are also consistent issues. This was especially a problem with abandoned vehicles. The Keller administration inherited a list of unresolved abandoned vehicle reports that numbered in the thousands, many of them several years old.

Abandoned vehicle calls must be verified in person. It quickly became evident that personally checking each of these old calls was not the best use of taxpayer time and money. In March of 2019, the City closed old outstanding tickets. Responders were then able to prioritize handling and closing the remaining tickets more efficiently. Since we closed the old cases, we have received over 3,000 new cases. As of February 5, 2020, only 467 of those cases remained.

A multi-department task force including DMD Security, Parking Enforcement, APD, and 311 is tackling the remaining backlog and managing new reports as they come in. Using a report generated by 311, the team compares cases to eliminate clear duplicates before sending inspectors out to the field. Of the 275 referrals for Abandoned Vehicles in January, 116 vehicles were tagged, and 14 were towed. Vehicles on public property are referred to the Abandoned Vehicle Unit, vehicles on private property are referred to code enforcement. The process to remove a vehicle from private property is considerably more time-intensive.

 Fourth of July

 In 2019, miscommunication between Albuquerque Fire and Rescue and 311 led to both department call centers being closed on the Fourth of July. While the 311 website and One ABQ app were still available, frustrated residents could not call in a report of illegal fireworks. That’s changing this year, as 311 will remain open and serve as the official point of contact for these non-emergency reports. In the event of a fire or other emergency, residents should, as always, call 911. And, as in many areas, the One ABQ app remains the most efficient way to make those reports when the technology is available.

  

As more trends demonstrating the needs of the community are revealed and the City continues to collaborate interdepartmentally and with community partners, 311 will continue to update and improve their practices in supporting all departments, divisions, and the public.

 

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JESSIE DAMAZYN

public information officer | mayor’s office

O 505.768.3029

m 505.259.0650

cabq.gov

Recycle Right ABQ Aims to Educate Residents on What and How to Recycle

How about making a New Years Resolution to love your planet? Recycling is part of that. The Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) told us about a new video on recycling the right way in the Weekly E-News of Monday, November 19, 2018.

“Did you know that 29% of materials placed into recycling carts are trash? The Solid Waste Management Department needs your help to change that! The City’s “Recycling Right” program educates and informs residents about what to recycle, how best to recycle, how to determine what should go in your blue recycle cart and teal bin, and much more. Join the conversation by sharing videos and photos about how Recycling Right has impacted your home or workplace by using the hashtag #RecycleRightABQ…and visit www.recyclerightABQ.com .”

Videos were made for the Recycle Right campaign. They are available on YouTube. To view these in your browser, do a search for “recycle right abq youtube.”

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Tips to Reduce Auto Theft Risks

Happy New Year everyone!  Now that the weather is cold, the days get dark early, and we are busy shopping; Ladera West Neighborhood Association would like to remind you of auto safety, including shopping safety. The Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) Weekly E-News of Monday, February 25, 2019 gives us this information to help us stay safe.

“With car thefts always being a concern, the Albuquerque Police Department has several tips to help keep your vehicle safe:

  • In winter months, do not leave your vehicle running to “warm up.” This is one very easy way for criminals to steal your car.
  • Always lock your car, close your windows, and engage your anti-theft device when leaving your vehicle.
  • Don’t leave your keys in your car for any reason.
  • Park in well-lit areas close to buildings.
  • Do not leave valuables in your car, including purses, wallets, cell phones, laptop computers, briefcases, backpacks or gym bags.
  • If possible, park your vehicle in a garage, behind a lockable gate, or in an area with good lighting.
  • If you take your vehicle for service, only leave your ignition key. Some people leave their entire key ring, including house keys, and copying these keys is another way thieves can strike.
  • Don’t keep vehicle registration, insurance paperwork, or other types of documents in your car. If there is a break-in, this information can be used for identity theft. Instead, keep this paperwork in your wallet and carry it with you.
  • Etch your vehicle identification number (VIN) on car doors, windows, windshields, engine blocks, and other parts.
  • Consider utilizing these other vehicle safety devices – a kill switch, a steering wheel lock, a steering column collar, brake locks, or wheel locks.

For more information on keeping your vehicle safe, visit: https://www.cabq.gov/police/crime-prevention-safety/auto-theft .”

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Winter Safety Tips for Your Pets

There’s an old saying, “If your cold, your dog is too.” Now, I know huskies probably are comfortable in our winters. But, most dogs weren’t bread for artic conditions. At our annual meeting, we learned that we are required to have shelter for our outside dogs. The Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) gives us strategies to keep our pets comfortable all winter long in its Weekly E-News of Monday, November 19, 2018.

“Cats and dogs can and do feel the cold, just as humans do, and hypothermia is a very real danger to them. To keep your furry friends warm, safe, and healthy this winter, here are some tips:

  • Keep your pets indoors in the winter when you’re not home.
  • If pet water bowls are outdoors, check them frequently to make sure the water has not frozen.
  • Don’t leave animals in closed cars in the winter. A car can become dangerously cold and can be just as deadly to an animal as in the summer.
  • Keep anti-freeze away from children and animals! Anti-freeze has a sweet taste that can attract them, and ethylene glycol is extremely poisonous.
  • If your pet has walked on salted or de-iced surfaces, clean them immediately with warm water and don’t let them lick their paws. These substances are toxic to animals.
  • Check your pet’s paws frequently for balls of ice or snow that can form there. Rinse with warm water to remove.
  • Pets that are outdoors often seek warmth and protection on or near a car’s engine. Bang on your car hood or honk the horn before starting the engine.
  • If your pet must be outdoors, insulate his or her bed with straw, and switch it out if it becomes damp.

For more winter pet safety suggestions and information, visit: www.cabq.gov/pets .”

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Winter Holiday Decorating and Poster Contest Rules

Hi Neighbors,
Are you enjoying the cooler weather? I’ll have more energy when the days get longer. But, it is the holiday season. And, it’s definitely busy. I hope we all find something that we enjoy. And, that we can find some time to relax. I’m looking for a Christmas Concert.
This weekend, Elmer Jackson, our membership chairman, will be hosting a FREE Book Fair this Saturday and Sunday, December 7 th and 8 th at Ladera Golf Course. This Book Fair focuses on Hardbacks and High-Quality Paperbacks for gift giving. Please bring Children’s and High-Quality books for a Christmas exchange. And, if you are hunger, try the $5.00 enchilada special.
And, the Neighborhood Association is getting into the Christmas spirit with a Winter Holiday Poster Contest and Winter Holiday Decorating Contest. So, get to coloring and decorating. I’m looking forward to seeing the winners. The rules are below.
Winter Holiday Poster Contest Rules:
All children and grandchildren of residents or business owners in the Ladera West Neighborhood (see note) up to the age of 15 are encouraged to submit a poster on the topic of winter holiday. The board of the Ladera West Neighborhood Association shall determine the winner of the poster contest. The child that designs the winning poster will receive a $25 gift card. Please submit posters to Ladera West Neighborhood Association by scanning it and sending it to LaderaWestNA@comcast.net or mailing it to 7716 Santa Rosalia St NW, Albuquerque, NM 87120. All letters must be emailed or postmarked on or before December 16th. Please include the name of the child and the resident, as well as, your address and phone number.
Winter Holiday Decorating Contest
Prizes: Gift certificates for 1 st place $50, 2 nd place $25, and 3 rd place $10 for Best Holiday Decorated House.
Nominations shall be taken for best holiday decorated house in the Ladera West Neighborhood (see note) through December 15 th, 2019. The board shall limit the nominations to 4 finalists. Neighbors will be asked to submit votes for the best decorated house through December 20 th, 2019. Votes will be submitted by email to LaderaWestNA@comcast.net or submitted via “contact us” at Laderawest.org. Winners will be announced to Ladera West and surrounding neighborhoods via NextDoor.
Note: Are you not sure if you live in Ladera West Neighborhood? If you are reading this on NextDoor, look at the name of the Neighborhood after your name or check the map tab on NextDoor. Ladera West is located east of Unser Blvd., west of Ladera Blvd., and south of Rinconada Arroya (at the northernmost part of Ladera Golf Course.
Sincerely,
Karen Buccola. President
Ladera West Neighborhood Association

Energy and Water Conservation Tips for Your Home

Autumn feels great. But, I’m starting to think of where I stored my winter clothes. It’s hard to believe that we will be comfortable in our winter routines in a few weeks. So, this is a good time to think about saving energy and water before winter arrives. Making these few changes could save you money all winter long. These tips are courtesy of the Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) Weekly E-News of Monday, January 28, 2019.

“With winter weather upon us, it’s a good time to take a look around your home and see how you can save money and conserve resources. Here are some ideas:

  • Seal up gaps around windows and doors with weather stripping and caulking.
  • Switch over to LED light bulbs, which may cost a bit more up front but last much longer and save money on electricity.
  • Adjust your thermostat and if possible, invest in a smart thermostat that can be programmed to automatically adjust.” (Or, join PNM’s Power Saver Program for a FREE Wi-Fi Programable Thermostat. For more Information, call 866-471-7906.)
  • “If possible, replace single-pane windows with double-pane units and low E-glazing.
  • Have your heater inspected and filters cleaned out.
  • Remember that you don’t need to water as much in the fall and winter months and adjust your irrigation needs accordingly.
  • Consider replacing your toilet with a low-flow unit, which saves money and is much more efficient.

To learn more about how to conserve energy and water during the winter months, visit: www.pnm.com or www.abcwua.org .”

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Recognizing and Preventing Child Abuse

In the last blog, we gained a better understanding of Child Abuse. In this continuation, we learn about physical and behavioral signs of abuse. Then, we learn how to report child abuse and help.

“Recognizing the Signs of Abuse

Children who are abused may or may not show physical or behavioral signs of being maltreated. In some instances, there may be an unusual pattern or location of physical injuries that suggests abuse. In other cases, there may be no physical indicators, but the child’s behavior has changed in a questionable and observable way. Educate yourself and others about some of the obvious and less obvious signs of possible child abuse, including:

PHYSICAL SIGNS

  • Injuries such as bruises, bums, welts, or broken bones that are unexplained or have implausible explanations.
  • Missing hair
  • Poor hygiene
  • Multiple injuries at different stages of healing
  • Improperly treated injury or medical condition
  • Slowed physical development
  • Unattended medical or dental needs
  • Consistent hunger
  • Inappropriate clothing for weather conditions
  • Speech delay
  • Frequent tardiness or absence from school

BEHAVIORAL SIGNS

  • Declining school performance or involvement
  • Lack of concentration
  • Difficulty making and keeping friends
  • Signs of persistent unhappiness or depression
  • Withdrawn from others
  • Displaying angry or aggressive behavior
  • Destruction of property
  • Hurting themselves or others
  • Low self-esteem
  • Problems expressing feelings
  • Fatigue, listlessness, or regularly falling asleep in class
  • Constantly seeking attention or approval
  • Sleeping problems or insomnia
  • Reluctance to go home

REPORTING SUSPECTED CHILD MALTREATMENT

Reporting suspected or known child abuse is a brave act that may prevent a child from being harmed or even save a child’s life. Any concerned individual who suspects or knows that a child is being threatened, abused or neglected needs to report that information to child protective services or law enforcement.

A report of alleged child maltreatment may be made by anyone. Voluntary reports come from family, friends, neighbors and other caring community members. Mandated reporting is a federal and statutory requirement for specific professionals and service providers, including but not limited to schools, medical staff, law enforcement, and social workers, who are legally bound to make a report when maltreatment or threatened harm to a child is suspected or confirmed. Reporters do not have to prove or personally witness the maltreatment. The law is very clear – reports should also be made when abuse or neglect is suspected or where there is a threat that maltreatment may occur unless action is taken.

To report suspected abuse or neglect statewide:               1-855-333-SAFE, or online at https://cyfd.org , or if you would like to help children in New Mexico affected by abuse and neglect visit https://pulltogether.org/.”

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Understanding Child Abuse

Have you ever noticed something is just not quite right with a child? The Bernalillo County Sheriff’s office gave us information to help us understand child abuse in the monthly magazine, “The Communicator,” from April 2019.

“Every child deserves to grow up in a safe, stable, and nurturing environment… Say Something, Do Something for Kids, by promoting and strengthening child abuse prevention efforts in Bernalillo County.

Children are the foundation of our society, our community and our future. Children raised in loving and supportive environments are more likely to prosper academically and financially, becoming successful contributing members of society. We need to enhance the success of our communities by promoting programs and policies that seek to support the lives of children and families. Preventing child abuse and neglect results in better childhoods, ultimately saving millions of dollars currently used to address the short and long-term effects of abuse on children, their families, and our communities. The savings generated through prevention can be used to serve our communities in other ways, making them safer, economically successful, and great places to live and grow.

What is Child Abuse and Neglect?

Child abuse is an act or failure to act by a parent or caregiver that results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation, or that creates an imminent risk of serious harm to a child. Child abuse typically refers to harm caused by parents or other caregivers, but acquaintances, strangers, and other persons may also be responsible for abusing a child.”

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Halloween Safety Tips

With Halloween this coming Thursday, we wanted to share some great tips from our friends at Ladera Heights Neighborhood Association:

Besides examining all treats before consuming them. consider these helpful tips:

  • Do not trick-or-treat alone. A parent, approved adult or responsible older sibling should always accompany young children.
  • If older children are going out, plan and review the agreed-upon route, and set a specific time when they should return home.
  • Check costumes for choking and/or tripping hazards.
  • Inspect costume accessories, especially swords, knives, wands, guns, lightsabers, ninja stars or other toy weapons. They should be soft and flexible and unable to cause real harm … or undue alarm.
  • Have charged cellphones with you at all times. (Do not keep them on silent.)
  • Use flashlights (with fresh batteries) and/or reflective tape or glow accessories for all children and escorts.
  • Stay in groups and communicate.
  • Travel together on well-lit streets and stay on the sidewalk (or use the far edge of the road, facing traffic).
  • Do not take shortcuts across yards or alleys. Use crosswalks or cross the streets at well-lit areas.
  • Don’t run!
  • Do not assume the right of way. Drivers may have trouble seeing trick-or-treaters in costumes. (And just because one car stops doesn’t mean others will!)
  • Only go to homes with a porch light on, and never enter a home or a vehicle for a treat.
  • Stay clear of lit candles and luminaries and be careful not to trip on cords, support lines or other decorations.
  • Notify law enforcement immediately if you see any suspicious or unlawful activity.

Prescription Trail Parks Offer Free Fitness Options

With the cool Autumn the days are getting shorter and more comfortable. Exercising outside seems easier again. This is a great time to soak in some sunshine before winter. “If you want to be out in the sunshine and get in some extra steps toward your daily recommended 10,000, why not check out one of Albuquerque’s many Prescription Trail Parks?

A Prescription Trail is a walking path in a city park, of varying length and degrees of difficulty. Albuquerque has nearly 30 Prescription Trails dotted about, with each installed as a way of encouraging residents, families and even pets to increase activity level. It’s also a good way to encourage residents to utilize their city parks.

‘The great thing about a Prescription Trail is that it’s easy to use’, said Christina Sandoval, Principal Planner at the Parks and Recreation Department. ‘No matter what level of fitness you’re at, you can take a walk or roll in a wheelchair. Even taking just one walk per day can have enormous benefits on your health.’

Walking is a great form of exercise, and can also be a gateway to other types of physical activity, such as working out or using fitness machines; and many Prescription Trail parks have fitness equipment, making our city’s free fitness options much more comprehensive.

‘We’ve found with many of our residents who walk the trails regularly oftentimes have a health issue that prevents them going to the gym, or they may not have the financial resources or inclination to go to a fitness center,’ said Sandoval. ‘But a Prescription Trail can be used by anyone. It’s actually a very inclusive program!’

When using a Prescription Trail for walking or running, always wear comfortable shoes and bring water. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans say that most adults should be physically active on a moderately intensive level for 30 minutes on most days of the week.

‘We really encourage all our residents to get out there and use these great trails,’ said Sandoval. ‘It’s not only good for your physical health, it’s also a great way to be part of all the fun events happening at all neighborhood parks across the city.’

The Parks and Recreation Department maintains and oversees 286 parks citywide, which includes the Prescription Trails parks, 14 dog parks, and City swimming pools. You can also enjoy one of the City’s four golf courses, and the 29,000-acre Open Space Program.

To learn more about the City’s Prescription Trail Program, visit: http://prescriptiontrails.org” (from the Office of Neighborhood Coordination’s “Neighborhood News” magazine, May 2019.)

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Child Safety

Now that we are all getting comfortable in our Autumn routines and the days are getting shorter, we need to remind ourselves and our children of the importance of being safe when we are outside. The Bernalillo County Sheriff’s Office, monthly “Communicator” of April 2019 gives us these pointers.

“Children and Teens are some of the most vulnerable victims of crimes when traveling to and from school, activities, social functions, and friend’s homes. Here are some helpful tips for children of all ages we would like to share with you and your family.

  • Try to walk places with your friends rather than alone.
  • Stick to well-lighted, well-traveled streets.
  • Avoid shortcuts through wooded areas, parking lots, or alleys
  • Take the safest route to and from schools, stores, or your friends’ houses.
  • Know where to go for help if you need it.
  • Carry your backpack or purse close to your body and keep it closed.
  • Have your car or house key in your hand before you reach the door.
  • If you think someone is following you, switch directions or cross the street. If they’re still there, move quickly toward an open store or restaurant or lighted house. Don’t be afraid to yell for help.
  • Be alert in the neighborhood. Call the police or tell an adult about anything you see that seems suspicious.”

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Annual Meeting This Tuesday – September 17th

Hi everyone,

Just a quick reminder that the annual meeting of the Ladera West Neighborhood Association will be this coming Tuesday, September 17th at 6:30 p.m. at the Ladera Golf Course Banquet Room.

Please click this link to see the flyer with full details.  See you Tuesday!  Ladera West Neighborhood Association Annual Meeting Flyer 2019

 

 

Door-to-Door Solicitation Safety Tips

The Office of Neighborhood Coordination, in the Weekly E-News, reminds us to be cautious of door to door solicitations.

“Illegal or unauthorized door-to-door solicitation presents a possible unsafe situation in the residential setting, and the Albuquerque Police Department offers suggestions below about safely handling unwanted/unauthorized solicitors:

  • If someone knocks on your door, if possible, ALWAYS check the area through a window, eye-viewer or camera system prior to opening the door, even if you are expecting a visitor. If someone unfamiliar is outside your door, you should be VERY cautious about opening the door.
  • If you have a security screen door and it is bolted and locked and you feel comfortable opening the inner door, do so but do not engage with the individual. Instead, politely ask them to leave.
  • If you do not have a security screen door, ask the visitor to leave the premises and notify them that you do not want them there through your closed and locked front door. Never allow the visitor access to your house for any reason. Once you have asked the visitor to leave your property, you should observe them leaving and be prepared to report suspicious activity to the police.
  • Don’t let a knock on the door go unanswered, whether through your security screen door, main door, or camera system, however. Criminals posing as a legitimate solicitor are looking for an empty house to eventually commit residential burglary, and if they break into an expected empty residence and find an occupant, the probability of a violent encounter is high.
  • If someone knocks on your door late at night asking for help, DO NOT OPEN THE DOOR. Instead, call 911 immediately.
  • If you have experienced an illegal solicitor or suspicious person knocking on doors in your neighborhood, alert your neighbors in the immediate area.
  • Remember that all legitimate businesses in the City of Albuquerque must have a permit to operate, and this includes the door-to-door solicitor per City Ordinance 13-3-1-1: “The Ordinance requires the individual to have on their person a permit that can be produced on request, which includes photo identification. Any solicitor that claims not to have one or has left it in another location should be considered illegitimate. If you desire the right of privacy, posting a No Trespassing or No Soliciting sign on your premises must be observed by the solicitor. Solicitation is permitted only between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and sunset.”

Visit: www.cabq.gov/police/documents/Door-to-Door-Solicitation.pdf to learn more about door to door solicitation safety.

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Local Adventures

Free Adventure Packs

With school starting, why not take the kids on an adventure to start studying. The City of Albuquerque Parks and Recreation Department’s Open Space Visitor Center has FREE explorer packs.

“Children and children at heart can stop by the Open Space Visitor Center to check out an Open Space Explorer Pack and experience the natural wonders we have to offer. The backpacks are intended to get families outside and in to nature to learn about plants, animals, and cultural resources found within Open Space. Each backpack is filled with exciting self-guided activities.”

“The packs are available for use Tuesdays-Sundays and must be returned by 4:30pm. Call 897-8831 to reserve a backpack for a particular time and day.” The Open Space Visitor Center is at 6500 Coors Blvd NW behind that interesting art installation. The center’s website is located at https://www.cabq.gov/parksandrecreation/open-space/open-space-visitor-center . They have a calendar of events.

Growers Markets Showcase Local Produce

But, then again, the hunt for fresh produce is also an adventure: a chance to learn about new foods and cooking methods.

“Have you been to one of Albuquerque’s many great Grower’s Markets yet? There are so many to choose from, and in every quadrant of the city! You’ll have your pick of fresh fruit and seasonal vegetables, homemade food, handcrafts, and much more! To see a map of all Albuquerque Grower Markets, visit: http://farmersmarketsnm.org/find-a-market/ .”  (from the Office of Neighborhood Coordination Weekly E-News of Monday, June 24, 2019)

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National Night Out – Friday 8/16/19

Come join Ladera West and Ladera Heights Neighborhood Associations on Friday 8/16 for a Picnic in the Park for National Night Out!!

WHERE:   Rinconada Pointe Park
(at Bob McCannon and Painted Rock)

WHEN:  6 to 8 pm

Check out the attached flyer here: National Night Out 8.16.19

Plan on stopping by to say hello and have a bite to eat!

August Newsletters and Ice Cream Social

Hi neighbors and Happy August!

Two great newsletters.  One from the Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) onc-newsletter-August 2019 that has articles on creating a family emergency plan, the ART Driver Education Program and IDO zoning updates.  Also, the Bernalillo County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO) has a great article on back to school safety tips, so a timely read. BCSO Newsletter_August 2019

As a reminder, please join us for an Ice Cream Social sponsored by Ladera Heights and Ladera West Neighborhood Associations as part of the National Neighborhood Night Out events at the Ladera Golf Course this coming Tuesday, August 6th, 2019 from 6 to 8 pm. Yummy! Ice Cream Social 8.6.19

Hope to see you there!

City of Albuquerque Launches Driver Education Efforts in Preparation for ART Buses Traveling in the ART Lanes

StayInYourLaneRackCard-front-final.pdf.jpg
Be Aware and Be Safe!!
The “Stay in your Lane” Campaign begins in Coordination with ABQ RIDE Driver Training on July 22.

The City of Albuquerque and APD will be coordinating a months-long awareness campaign to get drivers ready for the full operation of ART.  ABQ RIDE drivers are set to begin training in the ART buses on Monday, July 22. If you drive on Central Avenue between Coors and Louisiana, you’ve likely seen drivers crossing over the ART lanes to make turns onto or off of Central Avenue.

APD will begin educating drivers who are improperly using the ART lanes with warnings, in an effort to give drivers as much lead time as possible to get used to the inclusion of buses in the ART lanes on Central Avenue.

“Today, we are beginning a coordinated public outreach campaign to educate drivers about staying out of the ART lanes. As we prepare for full operation, we want drivers to be ready for the new normal along the corridor,” stated Lawrence Rael, Albuquerque’s Chief Operating Officer. “We’re starting now to give drivers as much lead time as possible to get used to the new flow of traffic. What better way to do it than with buses actually in the ART lanes during driver training.”

According to APD, this is about driver safety education, not enforcement. “We haven’t been giving warnings or tickets so far, because ART buses haven’t been using the corridor. Now that they’ll be running the full route on a regular basis, drivers can keep themselves and bus drivers safe by learning how to drive alongside the buses,” said Traffic Commander Donovan Rivera of APD. “During training, we’ll only issue warnings to remind people of the proper use of the lanes and why it keeps them as well as ART drivers and passengers safe.”

After training ends, APD will issue tickets to drivers violating the ART lanes, with fines of $80 for failing to obey the “Bus Only” signs, or for crossing the double white line. It is possible for drivers to incur fines for both infractions at the same time.

Driver training will consist of:

  • Docking at the stations
  • Adjusting to the height of the ART platform
  • Using the doors on both sides of the bus.
  • Deploying the bridge plates for wheelchairs
  • Testing of Transit Signal Priority along the corridor
  • Testing the automatic wheelchair restraint

As a reminder, message boards will be deployed along the nine mile long ART corridor for the first few weeks of the training to remind drivers to “Stay in Your Lane.”

StayInYourLaneRackCard-back-final.pdf.jpg

 

Tips to Protect Against Identity Theft

Protecting Yourself from identity theft is one of those topics that require frequent review. The Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) gave us these tips in the Weekly E-News of Monday, January 14, 2019. I would also like to encourage you to get your credit frozen/blocked through each credit reporting agency (Equifax, Transunion, and Experion.) Learn how from the US Federal Trade Commission at https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0497-credit-freeze-faqs . This is now a free service. And, no one can access your information to open new accounts without your prior authorization. Wishing you the best at safeguarding your information.

“Identity theft is a concern everyone shares. Here are a few tips from the Albuquerque Police Department on how to help protect yourself and your loved ones from this ongoing problem:

  • Never give out your Social Security number, particularly if someone calls or e-mails you and asks for it. Try not to carry your SSN card in your wallet.
  • Don’t respond to any unsolicited requests for personal information.
  • Consider getting a P.O. box at your closest post office. Thieves often break into mailboxes and steal credit cards, checks, or outgoing payments. If you can’t get a P.O. box, ensure that you check your mail every single day.
  • If you have a community mailbox in your neighborhood, check your mail every day and encourage your neighbors to do the same. If possible, ask a neighbor living close to the community mailbox to keep a regular eye on it.
  • If you are traveling for longer than a week, have a trusted neighbor pick up your mail, or have at temporary hold put on your mail at your post office.
  • When buying gas, try to go inside and have the store clerk run your credit/debit card, rather than using the outside card reader. Identity thieves are very good at installing skimmers that can read your card information and be used to create duplicate cards.
  • Check your banking accounts and credit card accounts frequently, and watch for unauthorized transactions, even small ones.
  • Shred receipts, credit offers, account statements, and expired cards, to prevent “dumpster divers” from getting your information.
  • Install firewalls and anti-virus software on your home computer and personal smart phone and tablet devices.
  • Create complex and different passwords for each of your online accounts. Change your password immediately if any of your credit card or banking companies has a data breach.

For more crime-prevention information, visit: https://www.cabq.gov/police/crime-prevention-safety .”

Finding a New BFF?

After that last series, don’t we all feel that we need a really good friend? I’ve mentioned my Best Friend Forever (BFF), Aria, before. There is no doubt of the love and support we get from our furry BFFs*. Dogs and cats are regulars in hospitals, social centers, schools, and libraries these days**. They comfort the ill, listen to children read, and help us get our exercise. Spring is a great time to get a new BFF.

Bernalillo County recently announced the opening of the Bernalillo County Animal Care and Resource Center. “This new animal care and resource center, at 3001 Second St. SW, is a little over 17,000 square feet and includes space for approximately 117 to 150 dogs and approximately 80-100 cats. Since many parts of the county are in rural areas, this new shelter will also provide more adequate housing for horses, cows, sheep and other livestock. Some of the exciting new programs and services will include many types of volunteer and recreational opportunities, educational and training classes for people and animals, camp programs, spay and neuter, microchipping and vaccination clinics, foster care, and much more.” Animal viewing from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday. Call (505) 314-0281 or (505) 468-PETS (468-7387) or https://www.bernco.gov/animal-care-services/animal-care-and-resource-center.aspx .

Other great options:

City of Albuquerque, Animal Welfare Department at

Eastside Shelter, 8920 Lomas Blvd NE, (505) 768-1975

Westside Shelter, 11800 Sunset Gardens Rd SW, (505) 768-1975

Lucky Paws Adoption Center, Coronado Center, 6600 Menaul Blvd NE, (505) 768-1975

PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – 350 Eubank Blvd. NE, (505) 298-4122

or, https://www.cabq.gov/pets/adoption .

Animal Humane at

615 Virginia St. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, (505) 255-5523 or

10141 Coors Blvd. NW, Albuquerque, NM 87114, (505) 323-PETS (7387)

or https://animalhumanenm.org/ .

There are many other facilities available from a web search.

* There are many websites for researching the best fit pet for you. For dogs, you can start at the American Kennel Club’s Dog Breed Selector website at https://www.akc.org/dog-breed-selector/ . Both the personality of the person and the personality of the animal must match for BFFs.

** Before bringing your BFF to any facility, please make sure the BFF and you are trained to behave correctly for that environment. A good start is the American Kennel Club’s Canine Good Citizen class – taught by various trainers in Albuquerque. Then, check with that facility for additional training requirements. In these situations, a trained dog is a blessing; and an untrained dog could be a disaster.

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Healthy Relationships: Recognizing Abusive Relationships

This is the last part of a series on relationships. Now that we have seen what unhealthy and healthy relationships look like, let’s learn the characteristics of abusive relationships. When you see these characteristics, please seek help from the resources listed in part 1 of this series and get your loved one to a safe place for recovery. Even though this series is on teen dating, these characteristics apply to any age group. This series is courtesy of the February 2019 issue of the Bernco Sheriff’s newsletter, the “Communicator.”

“Teen dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional aggression within a dating relationship, including stalking. It can occur in person or electronically and might occur between a current or former dating partner. Several different words are used to describe teen dating violence. Below are just a few:

  • Relationship abuse
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Relationship violence
  • Dating abuse
  • Domestic abuse
  • Domestic violence

Teen dating violence is widespread with serious long-term and short-term effects. Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Being able to tell the difference between healthy, unhealthy and abusive relationships can be more difficult than you would think. No two relationships are the same, so what’s unhealthy in one relationship may be abusive in another. Although there are many signs to pay attention to in a relationship, look for these common warning signs of dating abuse:

  • Checking cell phones, emails or social networks without permission
  • Extreme jealousy or insecurity
  • Constant belittling or put-downs
  • Explosive temper
  • Isolation from family and friends
  • Making false accusations
  • Constant mood swings towards you
  • Physically inflicting pain or hurt in any way
  • Possessiveness
  • Telling someone what they can and cannot do
  • Repeatedly pressuring someone to have sex

As teens develop emotionally, they are heavily influenced by experiences in their relationships. Healthy relationship behaviors can have a positive effect on a teen’s emotional development. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to:

  • Experience symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Engage in unhealthy behaviors, such as using tobacco, drugs, and alcohol
  • Exhibit antisocial behaviors
  • Think about suicide
  • Witness or experience violence in the home

Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent. Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

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Healthy Relationships: Recognizing Healthy Relationships

This is the second part of a series on relationships. Now that we have seen what unhealthy relationships look like, let’s learn the characteristics of healthy relationships. Please have another conversation with your loved ones. Please tell them how happy you want them to be and these are the minimum requirements of a healthy relationship. This series is courtesy of the February 2019 issue of the Bernco Sheriff’s newsletter, the “Communicator.”

“Healthy relationships share certain characteristics that our youth should be taught to expect:

  • Mutual respect: Respect means that each person values who the other is and understands the other person’s boundaries.
  • Trust: Partners should place trust in each other and give each other the benefit of the doubt.
  • Honesty: Honesty builds trust and strengthens the relationship.
  • Compromise: In a dating relationship, each partner does not always get his or her way. Each should acknowledge different points of view and be willing to give and take.
  • Individuality: Neither partner should have to compromise who he/she is, and his/her identity should not be based on a partner’s. Each should continue seeing his or her friends and doing the things, he/she loves. Each should be supportive of his/her partner wanting to pursue new hobbies or make new friends.
  • Good communication: Each partner should speak honestly and openly to avoid miscommunication. If one person needs to sort out his or her feelings first, the other partner should respect those wishes and wait until he or she is ready to talk.
  • Anger control: We all get angry, but how we express it can affect our relationships with others. Anger can be handled in healthy ways such as taking a deep breath, counting to ten, or talking it out.
  • Fighting fair. Everyone argues at some point, but those who are fair, stick to the subject, and avoid insults are more likely to come up with a possible solution. Partners should take a short break away from each other if the discussion gets too heated.
  • Problem solving: Dating partners can learn to solve problems and identify new solutions by breaking a problem into small parts or by talking through the situation.
  • Each partner should take time to understand what the other might be feeling.
  • Self-confidence: When dating partners have confidence in themselves, it can help their relationships with others. It shows that they are calm and comfortable enough to allow others to express their opinions without forcing their own opinions on them.
  • Being a role model: By embodying what respect means, partners can inspire each other, friends, and family to also behave in a respectful way.
  • Healthy sexual relationship: Dating partners engage in a sexual relationship that both are comfortable with, and neither partner feels pressured or forced to engage in sexual activity that is outside his or her comfort zone or without consent.”

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Reminder: Neighborhood Cleanup this Saturday!

Hi Neighbors and friends – Let’s show our community pride and have fun at the same time!!

It’s time for the Neighborhood Clean Up and it’s this  Saturday, April 27th, 9am to 12pm.

Volunteers meet at Rinconada Point Park (Bob McCannon Parkway & Painted Rock) for bags & supplies.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those items that fit in a bag will be picked up on this day.  The City will not pick up large items (stove, mattresses, etc.).

For more information go to: www.keepalbuquerquebeautiful.com

Looking forward to seeing everyone!

Healthy Relationships: Recognizing Unhealthy Relationships

With Spring, come young love. And, whereas those of us who are old enough to have teenage children know that there is a miniscule chance of teenage love lasting, unfortunately teenagers do not have the experience to know better. This will be a 3-part series on recognizing unhealthy relationships, recognizing healthy relationships, and recognizing abusive relationships. All of this is from the February 2019 issue of the Bernco Sheriff’s newsletter, the “Communicator.” Is it time for another conversation with your loved ones?

“Unhealthy relationships are marked by certain characteristics our youth should be aware of…:

  • Control: One dating partner makes all the decisions and tells the other what to do, what to wear, or who to spend time with. He or she is unreasonably jealous, and/or tries to isolate the other partner from his or her friends and family.
  • Hostility: One dating partner picks a fight with or antagonizes the other dating partner. This may lead to one dating partner changing his or her behavior in order to avoid upsetting the other.
  • Dishonesty: One dating partner lies to or keeps information from the other. One dating partner steals from the other.
  • Disrespect: One dating partner makes fun of the opinions and interests of the other partner or destroys something that belongs to the partner.
  • Dependence: One dating partner feels that he or she “cannot live without” the other. He or she may threaten to do something drastic if the relationship ends.
  • Intimidation: One dating partner tries to control aspects of the other’s life by making the other partner fearful or timid. One dating partner may attempt to keep his or her partner from friends and family or threaten violence or a break-up.
  • Physical violence: One partner uses force to get his or her way (such as hitting, slapping, grabbing, or shoving).
  • Sexual violence: One dating partner pressures or forces the other into sexual activity against his or her will or without consent.
  • Digital Abuse: Using technology to bully, stalk, threaten or intimidate a partner using texting, social media, apps, tracking etc…”

I hope that you are not seeing any of this behavior. But if you are, I encourage you to have that conversation sooner rather that later. I am giving you a list of resources that should be able to help.

Teen Dating Abuse Helpline: 1-866-331-9474

National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-4673

Trevor Lifeline (for LGBTQ* youth): I -866-488-7386

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: I -800-273-8255

National Runaway Safeline: 1-800-786-2929

National Domestic Violence Hotline I-800-799-7233

National Hotline for Crime Victims: I -855-484-2846

National Street Harassment Hotline: I -855-897-5910

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/tdv-factsheet.pdf https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/ipv-technicalpackages.pdf https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/yv-technicalpackage.pdf https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/sv-prevention-technical-package.pdf https://vetoviolence.cdc.gov/dating-matters

https://www.breakthecycle.org/

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Garage Sale Safety Tips

I am happy to announce that the Annual Ladera West Neighborhood Association Garage Sale will be Friday, May 3rd and Saturday, May 4th, 2019. With spring cleaning underway, we encourage you to plan a garage sale or partner with a neighbor to turn some of that clutter to cash. The Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) Weekly E-News of Monday, July 23, 2018 gave us some advice for having a safe garage sale.

“Summer always means garage sales, and there are a few things to keep in mind when having one:

  • Only two garage sales per year are allowed by City rule, and can’t exceed three days.
  • No signs advertising the sale are allowed on utility poles or in medians.
  • If possible, have an assistant or two to help you with sales and cash handling, and to prevent theft of sale items or cash.
  • Have plenty of change on hand – $1 bills, quarters, etc. – and keep a close eye on it.
  • Have a calculator on hand.
  • Specify that sale of all items is final and clarify that all sales are cash only.
  • For safety, have the sale in your more-visible yard or driveway, not in the garage.
  • Keep your pets indoors.
  • Keep your house doors and windows closed and locked, and keep your garage locked.
  • Before the sale, double-check all sale items to ensure no personal or financial information is left in them.
  • Watch for trip hazards such as cords, boxes, bags, or other clutter, and don’t display breakable items where they can be easily knocked over.
  • Keep anything that is not for sale out of sight.
  • Any items not sold at the end of the day could be put in a box marked “FREE” to eliminate further packing and cleaning up.
  • If you’ve put out signs, remember to take them down at the end of the sale and keep your neighborhood looking tidy.

For additional questions on garage sales, contact the Planning Department’s Zoning & Residential Code Office at (505) 924-3850, or visit: https://www.cabq.gov/planning/planning-faqs/code-enforcement-faqs .”

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Save The Date – The Great American Cleanup!!

Mark your calendars!  The Great American Cleanup will be held on Saturday, April 27th, 2019.  Meet us at Riconada Park at 9:00 am.  Trash bags and gloves will be provided.  Come meet your neighbors and have fun while we help clean our great neighborhood.

What is the Great American Cleanup?

The Great American Cleanup is a program of Keep America Beautiful.  It is the country’s largest community improvement program that kicks off in more than 20,000 communities each Spring. The Great American Cleanup, which marks its 21st year in 2019, engages more than 3 million volunteers and participants, on average, every year to create a positive and lasting impact.

The Great American Cleanup began as a litter cleanup initiative designed to aesthetically improve our environment by creating cleaner parks, streetscapes and public spaces through litter removal and elimination. To this day, community cleanups remain at the very heart of the campaign, and the results are remarkable. In 2018 alone, nearly 60 million pounds of litter and recyclables were collected by volunteers throughout the country.

Come join us and be a part of the Ladera West Neighborhood Association effort.

See you then!

Visitor Use Management Plan for Petroglyph National Monument

Distracted Driving

Shortly before my father passed in 2012, he told me, “These days, you need to drive like a mosquito hawk (i.e.: dragonfly). You need to look in all directions all the times.” How true. Sometimes it feels like we only arrived safely at our destination because of a miracle. The February 2019 issue of the Bernco Sheriff’s newsletter, the “Communicator” reminds us to drive safely and to have a conversation with loved ones about driving safely.

“Let us be honest. We are all guilty of this. We see it every day in the cars around us during our commutes. Changing music while driving, dealing with an unruly child in the back seat, or far more commonly, sneaking a peak at our phone to catch the latest text or email, even just talking on the phone causes serious distraction issues. Distracted driving is not becoming a problem, it IS a problem and we all contribute to it.

Distracted driving is outpacing DWI as the most dangerous violation on the road today, and if we do not do something to slow this, it will only get worse. Look at our children and how connected they are to their mobile devices.

Let me try to communicate to you just why distracted driving is so dangerous. Driving is a multitasking activity. There are many small, individual tasks that we do while we drive: steering, accelerating, braking, signaling, watching opposite direction traffic, watching cross traffic. There is a lot involved in driving. And if there is one thing that humans are not good at, it’s multitasking. We are really good at focusing on one thing, not so much with many things. And what exactly is going on while we are driving? Let’s pick a common speed limit here in town, say, 35 miles per hour and look at some numbers.

For each mile per hour you go, you are traveling about a foot and a half in distance. That doesn’t sound too bad, but let’s look at a vehicle going down 4th Street at 35 miles per hour. That is about 50 feet per SECOND. A quick two second glance at the phone has you traveling 100 feet, about 7 car lengths. Face it, that is a pretty short time period, and most looks at our phones are longer than that. A lot can happen in 100 feet. Cars pulling out in front of us. Cars stopping in front of us. Pedestrians crossing streets. Kids riding bikes. And this distance does not account for you seeing and reacting to the changing circumstances in front of you. Add in another second or two for that, and we are now talking about a 200-foot lane of potential disaster in front of us, all because we thought that whatever message coming through our phone was important enough for us to endanger not only ourselves, but EVERYONE else on the road. IT IS NOT WORTH IT.

We have to learn not to use our mobile devices while driving. We have to teach our children not to use their phones while driving. The cost in damage and more importantly, injury and death is becoming greater with each passing year. It is not worth it.

We here at BCSO are committed to combatting distracted driving in Bemalillo County. We are participants of the Department of Transportation’s DNTXT Campaign, and we actively look for drivers using their phones while driving. Using a phone without a hands-free device is illegal, and offenders will be cited. Many drivers who are stopped for using their phones while driving often think that we should be out stopping “real crime”. Our reply to that is Public Safety is our business, and helping to maintain safety on our streets and highways is a large part of this. Distracted driving causes more damage and injury than you can possibly imagine.

BCSO has a dedicated traffic enforcement unit. BCSO Motors/Traffic Investigations is committed to the enforcement of all traffic laws throughout the County of Bemalillo. If you see any traffic violation related issues, please feel free to contact Captain Joshua Kingsbury at 505-314-0044, and we can work together to put a plan in place to deal with it. As always, stay safe.”

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IRS Warns of Potential Scams During Tax Season

Once again, we are reminded to be cautious of giving out our personal information. That person posing as the tax man may not be. The Office of Neighborhood Coordination (ONC) Weekly E-News of Monday, February 4, 2019 gives us the tips below to avoid imposters. I would also like to encourage you to get your credit frozen/blocked through each credit reporting agency (Equifax, Transunion, and Experion.) Learn how from the US Federal Trade Commission at https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0497-credit-freeze-faqs . This is now a free service. And, no one can access your information to open new accounts without your prior authorization.

“‘Tis the season for taxes, and with taxes come the usual fraudulent attempts to steal identities and funds. Below are some tips and reminders about how to avoid possible identity theft:

  • The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reminds residents that they DO NOT initiate contact with taxpayers via e-mail to request personal or financial information, so if you receive an e-mail claiming to be the IRS asking for information, delete it immediately.
  • Do not click on links or download attachments from unknown or suspicious e-mails.
  • Protect your personal information. Try not to carry your Social Security card in your wallet, and destroy and shred documentation with that information on it.
  • If you receive a telephone call or e-mail asking for personal or financial information, hang up immediately and report the call to the IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting hotline at (800) 366-4484, or by e-mailing: phishing@irs.gov .
  • Always use security software on your computer, including a firewall and anti-virus protection.
  • Have very strong passwords and don’t use the same password for different accounts.
  • For more information on potential IRS scams and what you can do to protect yourself, visit: https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/taxpayer-guide-to-identity-theft .”

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